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<code>Boom. Yes, I know. I hate wiki formatting too.</code>
 
<code>Boom. Yes, I know. I hate wiki formatting too.</code>
 
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*[[Asphodel Meadows Raid]] by {{Name|Distant Tide}}
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*[[Siege of Sirona]] by {{Name|Timothy Emeigh}}
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*[[Battle of the Sundered Shore]] by {{name|SilverLastname}}
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*[[Battle of Grannus]] by {{name|EvenManatee887}}
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Oh boy. Ohhhh boy. This is a lot.
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*[[Asphodel Meadows Raid]] by {{Name|Distant Tide}} - [Prose wordcount: 2,427]
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::This is by far the smallest scale battle out of the four, and while this makes the infobox rather lightweight and lacking of information, the dramatis personae you have serves to fill in those gaps rather nicely, along with providing a little backstory and info about how everyone's roads leading to the raid. However, I still feel like it's an insufficient substitute for a proper prelude/background section introducing the bigger actors as a whole - the biggest gap to my eyes was that the nature of the Syndicate is never really elaborated on, nor their relations to the Created (and the Assembly, too?). I'm aware that there's probably far more further reading that would've elaborated this, but the lack of even a brief explanation of what they are - criminal organization, Created vassal, insurrectionist splinter, stellar quasi-state? - leaves a rather awkward hole right at the heart of this piece, and it's evident even from the opening quote; ''why'' is this attempted strike on the Syndicate a blow against the Created?
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::As for the main body of the article, I find the focus and wordcount devoted to certain parts over others to leave the article feeling a little lopsided. The preparation, securing of the ''Tofu XII'', and even the opening moves of the raid itself felt methodical, believable, and built the picture of a efficient (if somewhat improvised) playbook - but the amount of airtime it got relative to the combat onboard the station feels awkwardly unbalanced. The UNSC strike force, dominant (or at the very least on even footing) up until this point are laid low in a single paragraph; Silverthorne gets only his second mention in the entire article before being presumably killed offscreen with the remainder of the team in one fell swoop - and, well, nobody else in the team gets a mention beyond a line about them tiptoeing around Prometheans. The fight through the station just feels very skimmed over, and it's a bit of a jarring turn from having Phoenix-Two comfortably clearing Syndicate security to <s>rocks fall</s> Kahn shoots, everyone dies.
  +
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::I still think the piece was very well executed technically - there's relevant and useful crosslinks on characters and kit, without being excessive or having one for everything that moves, and similarly the images complemented the piece nicely (although I would've tweaked some things - the "Hot Jupiter" pic felt like a bit of a tangent, and the info in the caption for the Furthest Point is just re-covering context given in the dramatis personae). It's a short, sweet piece that covers a very specific battle, and does so well, but without context for the Syndicate or detail of the combat itself, I have to say this is left feeling quite incomplete.
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*[[Siege of Sirona]] by {{Name|Timothy Emeigh}} - [Prose wordcount: 2,342]
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::Ah, this has the taste of a classic. The UNSC outnumbered, outgunned, and clinging on by sheer bloodymindedness. The prelude has just the right amount of context to make sense of things without dragging on, the infobox is packed with information about the forces and the battle's place in the war, and the main body of the piece...
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::...seems to be trying to cover two things at once?
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::Somewhat similar to Tide's entry, things feel a tad lopsided here, in the speed of events and their pacing within the body of the article. Most notably, the orbital campaign seems to end with a bit of a whimper - there's not much talk ''about'' the failed counterattacks that eat away at the UNSC forces, but as soon as the ODPs fall they're very comfortably wiped. I suppose there's definitely a weirdness about trying to write a siege and make it work in the context of space battles and the groundside campaign, and that it's awkward to try and write around that to make it work, but the other thing that nags at me is the timescales involved and the sequence of events. Reach Syndrome rears its head here, in the somewhat clumsy timeskip of a whole year between the ground campaign starting and the orbital one being lost, but also in the way the Covenant are still able to support said campaign with the ODPs and fleet intact. Was the loss of 90% of fighter escorts and 30% of landing craft within the first wave? If not, was that over the course of the campaign - or if so, how did they sustain said campaign? Did Conviction just decide to sic all the ground assault forces on Sirona at once, then sit at arm's length of the ODPs to stop any possible relief force? To clarify - I'm not saying that you should've picked one of these, or that any of them could be bad (I personally think all of them could work, given the right execution) - it's just a bit confusingly ambiguous between them.
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::As for the ground battle section, however - this is a gem. The hastily-put-together defences, the UNSC troops working with their knowledge of the local terrain, the delaying actions and pincer attacks, all of it swaps very smoothly back and forth between talking about the tactical and strategic moves by both sides in a way that makes me feel like it's a Total War game. The genuinely unexpected twist of it being the ''attacking'' Covenant forces being trapped into a last stand was very good too, as was the solid conclusion that solid tactics and home advantage had won the day, rather than any asspulling or secret materiel superiority. The only things that were really confusing about this part were context - I was never quite sure about the ''name'' of the capital, and a map would've done wonders for clearing up what was happening on the broader operational front (I vaguely remember one being posted on the Discord, but I can't find it off the top of my head).
  +
  +
::I honestly feel that the ground battle is outstanding, and maybe would've even worked better as an expanded standalone piece, as right now it's dragged down a little by its placement and the flow of the article around it. It all takes place within the third paragraph of the "Orbital Battle" section, and the end of it references events that come a year later - it feels more like a sub-article set within the Sironan(?) campaign rather than part of a sequence of events (since the orbital battle was still ongoing after it) in the article. Still, the attention to detail on the ground side made that really quite enjoyable - the extra context given in the captions about the Jabber and the Pangolin, the timeline covering both the Earth and local calendars. I also enjoy the weaving together of different aspects outside your own work that I've seen around - as well as the two vehicles (which might have benefited from a crosslink) I also see Alaska popping up in there. I'm aware that there was more cut off for time concerns (both by "placeholder" and the extra timeline points), and I would've really liked to see these - but as it stands the overall flow does feel a bit disjointed.
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*[[Battle of the Sundered Shore]] by {{name|SilverLastname}} - [Prose wordcount: 3,393]
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::Wow, this is... weird? Cool? Intriguing, let's go with that.
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::This reads, well, very much not like a battle article, and much more like a chronicle, maybe retold internally within the Covenant. I assume that was the intent, and I have to say it definitely lends a much more unique tone to it - but I'm ambivalent about whether or not it was the right direction to with. Sometimes it lends the piece a much more grandiose feel, a poetic retelling of grand battles and heroics - like the second half of ''The Arrival'' and ''The Oracle'' after it - on occasion it instead seems to add bulk to the piece that slows it down.
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::While sitting as a relatively simple sequence of events, the structure is also really interesting - being fit into thematic and "chapter"-like narrative sections instead of more clearly delineating between battles
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*[[Battle of Grannus]] by {{name|EvenManatee887}}
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== These are Not Your Skies ==
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High in the skies of Requiem, one iteration of Harriet McVey is about to have a ''very'' bad day.
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-----
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''"Opportunity Knocks,'' Sabercat 2-1 here. Strike package of three F-41 Echos checking in, fully loaded and ready for tasking." The pilot seats weren't just reinforced to withstand the weight of an armoured Spartan in the cockpit, they were ''designed'' for it, and aided by inertial compensators governed by an algorithm that was only ''slightly'' too dumb to be formally classed as an AI. Yet somehow, Hari always felt like there was the slightest of creaks whenever she pulled any hard turns. Hell, there probably was. She just didn't like thinking about it.
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<code>"Sabercat 2-1, ''Opportunity'' actual. You've been scrambled to provide cover for Fireteam Buckler and their support elements, around 30 klicks north of your position."</code> At the mention of directions, Hari's eyes flickered down to the cockpit tacmap, then back up again. COM was cracklier than usual, but nothing to really worry about. Probably. <code>"Buckler reports that Promethean forces are supported by CAS elements, specifically VTOLs of a type unknown at this time. How copy?"</code>
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"Solid copy, ''Opportunity.'' Tell 'em we're flooring it, Sabercat out." With a little more pressure on the throttle, the Broadsword's engines rose from a rumble to a growl, and Hari felt a touch more acceleration pushing her back into that seat; only a fraction of what she should have experienced, but the compensators always let some of the G-forces through to provide some force-feedback. For the briefest of moments, she wondered how her wingmen were handling things - on one hand, their constitutions weren't anywhere near as tough as her own augmented biology, but they also didn't have half-ton titanium shells to lug around. Hell, why
   
   
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==Oops, Reality Machine Broke==
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You know, you never really realise how much you take gravity for granted until it's swept out from underneath your feet.
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In a moment, I was weightless; in two, I was starting to drift off the floor. Halfway through the third, instincts were beginning to kick in - I reached down, fumbling for the switch to magnetize my boots like I had practiced in a hundred training exercises dealing with loss of artigrav onboard a ship.
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Except, of course, we weren't aboard a ship.
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Nobody ever expected gravity to fail when you were planetside.
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By the fourth moment, panic gave way to planning - I reached out with one arm, hoping to push off the wall to my side and give Ollie some breathing room. Hoping we could orient ourselves and figure out what the hell we were gonna do with ourselves in zero-gee.
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Of course, all of ''that'' evacuated our minds the second gravity returned to us. Then it was an unceremonious drop to the ground, the
   
   
 
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Latest revision as of 23:40, July 13, 2020

Boom. Yes, I know. I hate wiki formatting too.

40px-Help.png This article, LegendOfElTopo/sandbox, is currently under active construction.


Oh boy. Ohhhh boy. This is a lot.

This is by far the smallest scale battle out of the four, and while this makes the infobox rather lightweight and lacking of information, the dramatis personae you have serves to fill in those gaps rather nicely, along with providing a little backstory and info about how everyone's roads leading to the raid. However, I still feel like it's an insufficient substitute for a proper prelude/background section introducing the bigger actors as a whole - the biggest gap to my eyes was that the nature of the Syndicate is never really elaborated on, nor their relations to the Created (and the Assembly, too?). I'm aware that there's probably far more further reading that would've elaborated this, but the lack of even a brief explanation of what they are - criminal organization, Created vassal, insurrectionist splinter, stellar quasi-state? - leaves a rather awkward hole right at the heart of this piece, and it's evident even from the opening quote; why is this attempted strike on the Syndicate a blow against the Created?
As for the main body of the article, I find the focus and wordcount devoted to certain parts over others to leave the article feeling a little lopsided. The preparation, securing of the Tofu XII, and even the opening moves of the raid itself felt methodical, believable, and built the picture of a efficient (if somewhat improvised) playbook - but the amount of airtime it got relative to the combat onboard the station feels awkwardly unbalanced. The UNSC strike force, dominant (or at the very least on even footing) up until this point are laid low in a single paragraph; Silverthorne gets only his second mention in the entire article before being presumably killed offscreen with the remainder of the team in one fell swoop - and, well, nobody else in the team gets a mention beyond a line about them tiptoeing around Prometheans. The fight through the station just feels very skimmed over, and it's a bit of a jarring turn from having Phoenix-Two comfortably clearing Syndicate security to rocks fall Kahn shoots, everyone dies.
I still think the piece was very well executed technically - there's relevant and useful crosslinks on characters and kit, without being excessive or having one for everything that moves, and similarly the images complemented the piece nicely (although I would've tweaked some things - the "Hot Jupiter" pic felt like a bit of a tangent, and the info in the caption for the Furthest Point is just re-covering context given in the dramatis personae). It's a short, sweet piece that covers a very specific battle, and does so well, but without context for the Syndicate or detail of the combat itself, I have to say this is left feeling quite incomplete.


Ah, this has the taste of a classic. The UNSC outnumbered, outgunned, and clinging on by sheer bloodymindedness. The prelude has just the right amount of context to make sense of things without dragging on, the infobox is packed with information about the forces and the battle's place in the war, and the main body of the piece...
...seems to be trying to cover two things at once?
Somewhat similar to Tide's entry, things feel a tad lopsided here, in the speed of events and their pacing within the body of the article. Most notably, the orbital campaign seems to end with a bit of a whimper - there's not much talk about the failed counterattacks that eat away at the UNSC forces, but as soon as the ODPs fall they're very comfortably wiped. I suppose there's definitely a weirdness about trying to write a siege and make it work in the context of space battles and the groundside campaign, and that it's awkward to try and write around that to make it work, but the other thing that nags at me is the timescales involved and the sequence of events. Reach Syndrome rears its head here, in the somewhat clumsy timeskip of a whole year between the ground campaign starting and the orbital one being lost, but also in the way the Covenant are still able to support said campaign with the ODPs and fleet intact. Was the loss of 90% of fighter escorts and 30% of landing craft within the first wave? If not, was that over the course of the campaign - or if so, how did they sustain said campaign? Did Conviction just decide to sic all the ground assault forces on Sirona at once, then sit at arm's length of the ODPs to stop any possible relief force? To clarify - I'm not saying that you should've picked one of these, or that any of them could be bad (I personally think all of them could work, given the right execution) - it's just a bit confusingly ambiguous between them.
As for the ground battle section, however - this is a gem. The hastily-put-together defences, the UNSC troops working with their knowledge of the local terrain, the delaying actions and pincer attacks, all of it swaps very smoothly back and forth between talking about the tactical and strategic moves by both sides in a way that makes me feel like it's a Total War game. The genuinely unexpected twist of it being the attacking Covenant forces being trapped into a last stand was very good too, as was the solid conclusion that solid tactics and home advantage had won the day, rather than any asspulling or secret materiel superiority. The only things that were really confusing about this part were context - I was never quite sure about the name of the capital, and a map would've done wonders for clearing up what was happening on the broader operational front (I vaguely remember one being posted on the Discord, but I can't find it off the top of my head).
I honestly feel that the ground battle is outstanding, and maybe would've even worked better as an expanded standalone piece, as right now it's dragged down a little by its placement and the flow of the article around it. It all takes place within the third paragraph of the "Orbital Battle" section, and the end of it references events that come a year later - it feels more like a sub-article set within the Sironan(?) campaign rather than part of a sequence of events (since the orbital battle was still ongoing after it) in the article. Still, the attention to detail on the ground side made that really quite enjoyable - the extra context given in the captions about the Jabber and the Pangolin, the timeline covering both the Earth and local calendars. I also enjoy the weaving together of different aspects outside your own work that I've seen around - as well as the two vehicles (which might have benefited from a crosslink) I also see Alaska popping up in there. I'm aware that there was more cut off for time concerns (both by "placeholder" and the extra timeline points), and I would've really liked to see these - but as it stands the overall flow does feel a bit disjointed.



Wow, this is... weird? Cool? Intriguing, let's go with that.
This reads, well, very much not like a battle article, and much more like a chronicle, maybe retold internally within the Covenant. I assume that was the intent, and I have to say it definitely lends a much more unique tone to it - but I'm ambivalent about whether or not it was the right direction to with. Sometimes it lends the piece a much more grandiose feel, a poetic retelling of grand battles and heroics - like the second half of The Arrival and The Oracle after it - on occasion it instead seems to add bulk to the piece that slows it down.
While sitting as a relatively simple sequence of events, the structure is also really interesting - being fit into thematic and "chapter"-like narrative sections instead of more clearly delineating between battles








The Haunting of Block AC417-F Edit

Block AC417-F was haunted. Everyone knew that. Well, all of the rest of the Rats knew that, at least, and Harriet had never really gotten around to asking them how they knew. It was just a thing that was known, that was accepted, that was constant - like how the sun rose each day, how the tap water in her flat always tasted of metal, how her mam always dusted down the blank, empty holoframes every day, even though they had been dead as long as she could remember. Her family was just like any other on this dustball, at least as far as she knew - and the idea of worlds beyond this one were nothing more than far-off dreams, fairytales about how her parents had roamed between the stars once; how she had, too, for the first few precious years of her life.

She dismissed those stories as casually as she dismissed the laughter of the rest of the Rats when they thought she was out of earshot. Sure, she was a kid, but so what? She was just as good as any of the rest of them, and today was her chance to prove it. Plenty of them had talked about planning, trying to explore Four-Seventeen-F, but none of them had had the guts to do it so far! Well, that was hardly for want of trying. She knew that Jacks had been making plans to, or at least thinking about it - well, if he hadn't been, then she wouldn't have been able to pinch his makeshift grappler, would she? She wouldn't be scaling the side of the block, scampering between ledges, climbing rusted fire escapes and shaky scaffolding left behind from maintenance projects forgotten long ago. Here and there were she could still find scraps of the life the building had once held - toolboxes jammed shut with dirt, their mag-lock keypads cold and dead; ventilation units and security cameras still, silent, gummed up by dust and cobwebs. She wasn't particularly worried about the latter, though. They hadn't moved in the long hours it had taken her to get here and climb up this high



These are Not Your Skies Edit

High in the skies of Requiem, one iteration of Harriet McVey is about to have a very bad day.


"Opportunity Knocks, Sabercat 2-1 here. Strike package of three F-41 Echos checking in, fully loaded and ready for tasking." The pilot seats weren't just reinforced to withstand the weight of an armoured Spartan in the cockpit, they were designed for it, and aided by inertial compensators governed by an algorithm that was only slightly too dumb to be formally classed as an AI. Yet somehow, Hari always felt like there was the slightest of creaks whenever she pulled any hard turns. Hell, there probably was. She just didn't like thinking about it.


"Sabercat 2-1, Opportunity actual. You've been scrambled to provide cover for Fireteam Buckler and their support elements, around 30 klicks north of your position." At the mention of directions, Hari's eyes flickered down to the cockpit tacmap, then back up again. COM was cracklier than usual, but nothing to really worry about. Probably. "Buckler reports that Promethean forces are supported by CAS elements, specifically VTOLs of a type unknown at this time. How copy?"

"Solid copy, Opportunity. Tell 'em we're flooring it, Sabercat out." With a little more pressure on the throttle, the Broadsword's engines rose from a rumble to a growl, and Hari felt a touch more acceleration pushing her back into that seat; only a fraction of what she should have experienced, but the compensators always let some of the G-forces through to provide some force-feedback. For the briefest of moments, she wondered how her wingmen were handling things - on one hand, their constitutions weren't anywhere near as tough as her own augmented biology, but they also didn't have half-ton titanium shells to lug around. Hell, why


40px-Help.png This article, LegendOfElTopo/sandbox, is currently under active construction.
40px-Terminal.png This article, LegendOfElTopo/sandbox, was written by LegendOfElTopo. Please do not edit this fiction without the writer's permission.
Hari-G055
G055
Biographical Information

REAL NAME

Harriet McVey

ALIAS

"Moz" (Callsign)

DATE OF BIRTH

Jan 11, 2538

HOMEWORLD

Miridem

Physical Information

GENDER

Female

HEIGHT

6'7" (in armour)

6'1" (out of armour)

WEIGHT

96 kg

Political/Military Information

SPECIALTY

  • CQC
  • Urban Mobility, Reconnaisance
  • Piloting

SPARTAN TAG

G055

CLASS

Spartan-III

(Gamma Company)

UNIT

Team Kalis (former)

Team FORTUNE (current)

AFFILIATION

UNSC

[Source]

Harriet McVey, known primarily by her service tag Hari-G055, is a SPARTAN-III supersoldier of Gamma Company, who served in the final year of the Human-Covenant War and into the post-war years. While her promising individual performance in her early years marked her as a promising candidate for transfer to more specialised training, the competitive streak responsible for it was seen as a potential liability, and instead she continued training with the remainder of the Company. While deployed too late to see action in the Fall of Reach, Hari and her team, Kalis, were diverted towards Sol, arriving in time to see action in numerous battles in the Asia-Pacific theatre of the Battle of Earth, although this exacted a devastating toll on the still-green Spartan team.

Following the armistice and the end of the war, Kalis was disbanded, ostensibly due to the casualties suffered in the numerous battles towards the end of the previous year. While some of her surviving team members were swept up by ONI, Hari herself was bounced between a number of low-risk postings by Spartan Branch, before eventually being paired up with another former ally and transferred to the Category-II Spartan Team FORTUNE.


BiographyEdit

ChildhoodEdit

Main article: The Haunting of Block AC417-F

Harriet McVey was born on the 11th of January, 2538, to a pair of relatively wealthy interstellar traders. Nominally resident on the major port world of Alluvion, the couple often drifted between worlds, delegating the day-to-day running of their company to others and dealing with the bigger picture from the bridge of the cargo ship they had used since the earliest years of their business. For the first few months after Harriet's birth, they were content to continue this practice; thoughts of when and where they would settle down were far off in the distance, and there was always one more run to be done before then.

However, this world of reasonable comfort came tumbling down within the year; the shipping company and its assets were seized under UNSC emergency law for use as troop and materiel transports, and with the token sum they were given the family were forced to settle down on the inner colony world of Meridem. With almost nothing left to the family name, Hari grew up on the densely packed streets as a city rat, soon picking up a particular talent for navigating her way around the walls and roofs of the run-down housing blocks. In spite of this skill she was still often derided as the runt of the group given her age - and in return, her resentment grew into a drive to prove herself to them, to be just as strong or fast or smart as the bigger kids. Unfortunately, this, too, would be denied to her - when a Covenant force arrived in the system, there was little her or her parents could do to get through the panicked, chaotic crowds surrounding the handful of UNSC evacuation transports available. Instead, a few contacts and final favours called in allowed her parents to secure her a seat on a small, barely slipspace-capable cargo hauler out of the system, and she would eventually be picked up by ONI at a refugee processing facility and acquired for the SPARTAN-III programme.


TrainingEdit

Service HistoryEdit

Upon arrival at Onyx, Hari was immediately

Early DeploymentEdit

Battle for EarthEdit

Main articles: Danger Close and Another Night on the Town

During

Post-WarEdit

Personality & TraitsEdit

RelationshipsEdit

Physical ProfileEdit







IRONSIDE-class MJOLNIR

Shapeable energy shields? Forerunner signature bafflers? Twelve fuckin' AIs? Look, boss, kick out all these crutches and a suit of armour still needs to be a suit of armour - and if there’s one thing I know for sure, it’s that you can’t hack a quarter-inch of Titanium-A."

IRONSIDE-class Mjolnir is a variant of MJOLNIR Powered Assault Armour [GEN2] developed and produced by Hannibal Weapons Systems. Originally developed as a simpler, stripped-down design for ease of manufacturing and training, it later saw usage in contested electronic environments, where more sophisticated designs were hobbled by interference and jamming.

DevelopmentEdit

Early ConceptsEdit

As the expanding Spartan-IV programme began to draw on more and more recruits, a logistical problem swiftly presented itself; much of the industrial capability and design expertise behind the existing GEN1 Mjolnir suits had been lost or destroyed in the Siege of the Inner Colonies, meaning that new Spartans were being augmented and trained without armor for them to wear.







In Which Alaska-013 Possibly, But Probably Doesn't, Die.Edit

The mess hall was filled with ODSTs and Marines gathered around tables; eating, talking, resting. Through the din, one voice - old, worn, raspy - cut through the others.

"Well, you can call me an old bastard, but they don't make 'em like they used to." He gestured down at the reheated portion on his plate, pausing to let a laugh ripple around the table before he continued. "No, I mean it. Even Spartans, y'know? The first batch we all figured were freaks, probably grown in a tube in some ONI lab somewhere - but these lot are more... helljumpers with implants and titanium-A bones. They’re all hard talk and bravado, but I've seen more of a few of them getting tossed around like the rest of us. Don't mean to talk them down, but... well, you know, maybe the others are just a better vintage."

He glanced around, watching the young faces of his table-mates, and cleared his throat,

"Now, I know you’ve heard stories 'bout the first Spartans. If I had money, I’d bet you’ve all, at the very least, heard of the Chief - and if not, I’m gonna have to ask my CO when we started recruiting folks who lived under rocks. There's stories that've been going around longer than some of you lot have been alive, though. Some that stick with you more than others."


"So, how many of you kiddos have heard 'bout a certain Alaska?"




Spartan Ruiz cleared his throat - sounding a little hesitant, even awkward, over comm. "You, uh, you guys hear that?"

The other two members of Team Heads paused, instinctively; their weapons raised, their eyes scanning the burnt-out city around them for long, tense moments.

"Nothing." Yenko let out a sigh, eyes rolling behind his polarised visor. "You just hearing things, or should I go fetch a Grizzly to scare these Innie rats out of their-"

-and he froze. His suit did, at least - inside, all he could do he could do was glance down at the armour restraint attached firmly to the chest plate, locking him in place.

"Motherf-"




A sizeable group of ODSTs, Marines and even the odd brave sailor had gathered around the table where the scar-faced man sat, now listening intently to the tales being told.

"...hell, I think I still can't tell ya about most of what happened, but that’s probably for the better. Aleria, though? That was one helluva mess. Me, the rest of my team, we were dropped in to push back the split-lips, and we had about as much luck as there is air in space."

He paused for effect, watching the reactions of the younger troops around him, the faint outline of a wry smirk growing on his face as he watched them rapt with attention.

"We'd made a little progress, pushing down to the old spaceport, when this massive Brute Chieftain showed up. Must've been, what, ten feet tall? Twelve? However big he was, the bastard shrugged off MA5 rounds like rain - me, I thought we were dead men walking 'til something tackled the damn Kong, slammed it to the ground." Another pause, the veteran Helljumper gesturing as if coming around to the punchline of the joke. "Alaska, of course."




Oops, Reality Machine BrokeEdit

You know, you never really realise how much you take gravity for granted until it's swept out from underneath your feet.

In a moment, I was weightless; in two, I was starting to drift off the floor. Halfway through the third, instincts were beginning to kick in - I reached down, fumbling for the switch to magnetize my boots like I had practiced in a hundred training exercises dealing with loss of artigrav onboard a ship.

Except, of course, we weren't aboard a ship. Nobody ever expected gravity to fail when you were planetside.

By the fourth moment, panic gave way to planning - I reached out with one arm, hoping to push off the wall to my side and give Ollie some breathing room. Hoping we could orient ourselves and figure out what the hell we were gonna do with ourselves in zero-gee.

Of course, all of that evacuated our minds the second gravity returned to us. Then it was an unceremonious drop to the ground, the











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